Fashion Forecast: 75% White, With Showers Of Token Black Girls

London Fashion Week, in all it's glory. I had a fantastic time, and if you were there or watching the shows online, I am sure you did too. However, I left London Fashion Week with a bitter sweet taste in my mouth. Because every catwalk I go to, I see a stream of white, skinny women. The models who don't match that, look like they've been thrown in, to pretend that care has been taken to acknowledge alternative tones and shapes. The amount of times I've seen that 'token black girl' and felt enraged, because no, putting an afro down the catwalk does not entitle you to start singing about your care for diversity. I want to see more Oriental Asian ladies, Indian ladies, Latina ladies.

White runway models walk to Beyonce’s ‘Formation’, a song about being a strong BLACK woman. ‘Models are walking the ‘Misha’ collection Australia Fashion Week, 2016. Imaged sourced: Cosmopolitan Online Article.

White runway models walk to Beyonce’s ‘Formation’, a song about being a strong BLACK woman. ‘Models are walking the ‘Misha’ collection Australia Fashion Week, 2016. Imaged sourced: Cosmopolitan Online Article.

In 2016, less than 1/4 of runway models were non- white, which does not reflect the cities in which the collections are displayed.

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London for example, is reportedly made up of 41% ethnic minorities.- Trust For London. So how can a designer have the audacity to come to a melting pot of cultures and ethnicities and put on a catwalk displaying 82% white models

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If you are a designer, photographer, director, or any other type of creative, I proposition you this. How about, instead of copying industry leaders, rebel against them, flip the tables. If only 25% of models are ethnic minorities, how about you use 25% white models, and the rest other tones. But don't be basic, don't use just black girls, or just dark European girls. Mix it up, be creative, be as wildly diverse as you can. Because every time you post a picture on instagram or on your blog, a little girl somewhere is going to feel, for the first time, represented. That's priceless. Be the change that you want to see.

-Kalila Lickfold

Pixel London